Tips for Taking a Great ID Badge Photo

0 Comments

If you’re anything like me, you don’t necessarily look forward to having your picture taken, especially for an ID badge. Think about it – your driver’s license stays in your wallet, tucked away from the eyes of your friends and coworkers. On the other hand, many companies require that employees display their ID badge for all eyes to see!

Below is some advice for you and your ID badge “photographer” that will help you to put your best foot forward in your ID badge photo. 

1.    Outfit

Make sure to wear a flattering top that will look great in the photo. Avoid bright colors, big patterns and anything taupe, bright white or nude – these selections may wash you out or be distracting in a photo, especially when taken under fluorescent lights. I suggest sticking to darker colors (black, navy or dark blues and greens) or softer tones (soft whites, blues, greens, purples, etc.).

2.    Hair

A large part of looking your best for your photo is ensuring that your hair is neatly styled and away from your face. 

3.    Smile

Practice your smile in the mirror. You’ll want your smile to be natural and relaxed – don’t smile too big or too small. If you decide you don’t want to smile at least relax your face to avoid looking tense or angry.

4.    Eyes

This seems like a no-brainer, but make sure to look at the camera. You’d be surprised how many ID photos are taken with the subject looking to the side or above the camera.

5.    Relax

You are perfect just the way you are and if someone is nitpicking your badge photo, it says more about them than it does about you.

For the Photographer:

1.    Lighting

 Look for a place that has good lighting to take your team’s ID badge photos. The photo subject’s face should be seen clearly and any lights you use should be at least 3 feet away from the subject. This way the light isn’t in the picture and doesn’t cast a shadow or cause the subject to squint.

2.    Background

A plain background, such as the one provided with our ID Maker Systems, is always best for any ID badge photos. A wall that’s painted in a neutral tone or a backdrop in white, beige or light blue will result in the best photos. Your subject should then stand roughly one foot in front of the wall/backdrop to avoid shadows.

3.    Height   

Adjust camera height and angle as necessary so that just the subject’s head and shoulders are framed in the photo.

4.    Review

If you don’t like the photo you take, the team member probably won’t either. Review each photo after it’s taken so you’ll know before printing the ID badge if you should take another.

Hopefully these tips and tricks will put you at ease when getting ready for an ID badge photo. For some great ID badge design ideas visit our Sample ID Card Library to get your creative juices flowing. Who knows, you might even end up liking your photo! 

Write Comment

You must be logged in to write a comment. Log In

Top of Page